12 News & Views Magazine EDITION 1, 2017 basis, which is closely linked to important applications in food processing, food engineering, culinary, fermentation, food safety, food analysis and product development. Practi- cal labs are tightly integrated with the lectures, with labs taking place not only in conventional science laboratories, but also in the pilot plant and in the kitchen. Especially in their later years, our students are increasingly involved in practical assignments, relating for instance to product development, food safety, advanced culinary labs and process development and optimization. In the last year of their undergraduate program, students embark on a senior project, which, for Food Science, encompasses two phases. First, the students explore the scientific and technological literature on their topic of choice, and in close interaction with their faculty supervisor, develop a work plan for the second phase, which typically but not necessarily involves laboratory and/or pilot plant work. In this second phase, the students, often working in small teams, fully work out the basic hypoth- esis, deliverable or product concept developed in the first phase. A recent example of such a senior project format is that a group of senior project students successfully reformu- lated Cal Poly’s range of barbeque sauces, from the basic analysis of the existing, unsatisfactory recipes, to developing the concept of a common recipe platform for the various sauces, prototyping, consumer testing, scale up and the first actual production run. Next to their studies, students can also sign up to work as student employees in our food production, in which throughout the year various types of chocolate bars, jams and barbeque sauce are produced, in addition to numerous seasonal specialties. students graduating with the essential hands-on experience expected from Cal Poly graduates. Even small things help! A continuous but motivating challenge is to keep our Food Science curriculum fully up to date, and be prepared for new developments relating to food, the way it is consumed and our diet. For instance, young people these days do not only study for a job, but they are also looking for a purpose in life. Many of our students are increasingly interested in the role food plays in the context of health, environmental sustain- ability and a fair way to produce and market foods. The Food Science curriculum should address these interests, without losing focus on the key employment areas for our students in industry. The department also urgently needs additional financial resources to upgrade our kitchen and laboratory facilities. Our current equipment and facilities are not adequate to support our teaching and research demands. We hope to obtain funding from alumni and industry and I urge them to contact the Department if they would like to become involved and support the students and the program. CAL POLY IS KNOWN FOR THE FOCUS ON HAVING STUDENTS “LEARN BY DOING.” WHAT TYPES OF HANDS-ON EXPERIENCES DO YOUR STUDENTS GET DURING THEIR STUDIES THAT MAKE THEM READY TO STEP INTO THE WORKFORCE? Theory and application are offered hand-in-hand in Cal Poly’s Learn by Doing philosophy. This is apparent already in the lectures, which combine small class sizes with a theoretical The department also urgently needs additional financial resources to upgrade our kitchen and laboratory facilities. Our current equipment and facilities are not adequate to support our teaching and research demands. We hope to obtain funding from alumni and industry and I urge them to contact the Department if they would like to become involved and support the students and the program.