Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 444 News & Views Magazine EDITION 2, 2016 California accounts for about 20 percent of total U.S. processed food exports, and is the leading exporter of a number of products. International trade agreements have been the topic of heated political discussion over the last year. Potential new free trade pacts with the European Union and a number of Pacific Rim countries could yield positive results for the future of U.S. exports. However, there is a rising public sentiment in the U.S. against new trade agreements and for more protectionist economic policies. Some opponents to new agreements note that although international trade has clearly benefited some sectors of the U.S. economy, some industries and workers have clearly been left behind and are struggling to rebound. Congress and the new presidential administration will be grappling with these issues, and whatever direction U.S. policy takes in the future, it will affect California food processors. Export markets have become increasingly important to food and beverage processors. In recent years total CA processed food exports have ranged from $10 billion to $11 billion. California accounts for about 20 percent of total U.S. processed food exports and is the leading exporter of a number of products. Trade is important to the state’s economy, as every dollar worth of exported food products generates an additional $3.50 in economic output. With sufficient access to foreign markets, the future prospects for our industry are bright. As the global population rises to over 9 billion in the coming decades and purchasing power increases in developing nations there will be significant opportunities for all California food processors. This state specializes in the production of healthy fruit, nut, vegetable, dairy and beverage products that are in demand by consumers everywhere. However, numerous obstacles to trade remain. Although import tariffs have been declining due to multilateral and bilateral trade agreements, some nations frequently use tactics to discourage import trade such burdensome phytosanitary or labeling laws, byzantine import regula- tions, currency controls or government subsidies provided to domestic producers. Many developing nations have inadequate transportation and warehousing infrastructure to support import trade expansion. These issues must be addressed, but it will take time. The U.S. economy is closely linked to the rest of the world, and that is not going to change. Going forward, we must make sure that we have the policies, incentives and infra- structure in place to ensure that U.S. exports can grow and that other nations do not take unfair advantage of our open economy. President & CEOMessage By ROB NEENAN - CLFP President & CEO P.O. Box 1119 Stockton, CA 95201 (209) 943-8400 (209) 946-1753 FAX info@foodpro.net www.foodpro.net FACILITY DESIGN EQUIPMENT LAYOUT FEASIBILITY STUDIES MARKETING SERVICES LONG RANGE PLANNING PROJECT & CONST. MGT. California accounts for about 20 percent of total U.S. processed food exports, and is the leading exporter of a number of products. Trade is important to the state’s economy, as every dollar worth of exported food products generates and additional $3.50 in economic output.