Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 4416 News & Views Magazine EDITION 1, 2016 Caucus. I look forward to ongoing collaboration with CLFP regarding these issues. CLFP STATES (WHEN PROMOTING MEMBERSHIP) THAT THERE IS STRENGTH IN NUMBERS IN FOOD PROCESSING COMPANIES BEING ABLE TO REPRE- SENT THEMSELVES AS A GROUP RATHER THAN INDIVIDUAL COMPANIES. DOYOU AGREEWITHTHAT IDEA AND THINK IT HELPS IN BUILDING RELATION- SHIPS WITH SENATORS SUCH AS YOURSELF? I believe you can accomplish more by being united than divided. I’ve led my Caucus by following this approach, and I have seen it translate to other organizations I have been part of. THERE ARE MANY STATE ORGANIZATIONS LIKE CLFP IN CALIFORNIA, WHO RELY ON BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS WITH SENATORS SUCH AS YOUR- SELF TO HELP FURTHER THEIR ISSUES AND CAUSES. WHAT IS YOUR APPROACH ON WORKING WITH SUCH ORGANIZATIONS? HOW CAN THESE ORGA- NIZATIONS BEST FURTHER AND MAINTAIN SUCH RELATIONSHIPS? Trade associations provide expertise in their specific industry, which helps inform how a policy might impact the commu- nities I represent. As for how organizations like CLFP can maintain and further relationships with legislators, I know I work best with honest, reasonable problem-solvers who are genuinely willing to work toward policy solutions. YOU HAVE BEEN DESCRIBED AS A FRIEND TO THE INDUSTRY (CLFP, THE FOOD PROCESSING INDUSTRY IN CA). WHAT DOES THAT STATEMENT MEAN TO YOU? I take that as praise for working hard to represent the 16th Senate District since food processing is not only a job creator in our local economy, but there is overlapping policy agree- ment as to how we can make California a better place to live and operate a business. Over the last few decades, our state government continues to place additional regulatory burdens on businesses, including ones that CLFP represents, making it difficult and often times impossible to operate in California. As a legislator and the Senate Republican Leader, my priority is to help ease the unnecessary regulations that limit business expansion and job growth in California. WHAT WAS YOUR STANCE ON INCREASING MINI- MUM WAGE (WHICH CLFP OPPOSED)? YOUR WEBSITE SAID YOU ARE OPPOSED TO “A ONE-SIZE FITS ALL MINIMUM WAGE APPROACH, A BETTER APPROACH WOULD BE TO ALLOW CALIFORNIA COMMUNITIES TO DECIDE FOR THEMSELVES.” CAN YOU ELABORATE ON THAT STATEMENT? A minimum wage increase might make sense for big coastal cities in California who have passed minimum wage increases. They have relatively low unemployment, with a high cost of living. This is not the case in the inland cities like Bakersfield, Fresno, and countless other rural communities. These areas do not have the same cost of living problems as some California coastal cities. However, while it is less expensive to live in Bakersfield, our unemployment numbers are startlingly higher than the coastal communities due to overregulation and factors the state has continually ignored. That’s why I opposed the recent minimum wage legislation and have been advocating for a‘New Sacramento Mindset’ that focuses on finding‘win-win’solutions that benefit all Californians. As opposed to a one-size-fits-all minimum wage approach, a better approach would be to allow California communities to continue to decide for themselves what is best. A blanket approach presents yet another jobs roadblock for much of California. WHAT ISSUES AND BILLS DO YOU SEE IN THE NEAR FUTURE THAT YOU WILL SUPPORT OR OPPOSE RELATED TO THE FOOD PROCESSING INDUSTRY? We all know that California is one of the most expensive places in the country to live and do business. For example, CNBC listed California as the fifth most expensive place to live in 2015 and Chief Executive Magazine once again ranked California as the most expensive place to do business in 2015. I’ve fought hard for the right to sit at the state’s negotiation table with the other leaders. As Senate Republican Leader, I’m advocating for the interests of my constituents. We can …food processing is not only a job creator in our local economy, but there is overlapping policy agreement as to how we can make California a better place to live and operate a business. As for how organizations like CLFP can maintain and further relationships with legislators, I know I work best with honest, reasonable problem-solvers who are genuinely willing to work toward policy solutions.